Archaeology Articles by Colin Dovey — Knoji
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Colin Dovey has written 1 Archaeology articles, has received +12 recommendations and is currently the #15 ranked expert in this subject.
Here are Colin Dovey's articles in Archaeology:
Quetzalcoatlus was one of the most amazing creatures to ever grace this planet. Quetzalcoatlus is a type of pterodactyl that was native to North and Central America, and lived 68-65 million years ago. Quetzalcoatlus is considered one of the largest flying animals to ever lived, even dwarfing today’s condors. The name Quetzalcoatlus comes from the ancient Aztec god Quetzalcoatl, which was represented as a giant feathered serpent to his worshipers.
Published by Travis Burdick 230 months ago in Archaeology | +0 votes | 0 comments
The lost palace of Knossos was discovered in 1878 but the entire site was not successfully excavated until March of 1900. The excavation revealed some of the most amazing ancient artifacts and displayed one of the most significant palaces of the ancient Greek world however; reconstruction was ordered which led many experts to reconsider the palacesÂ’ legitimacy as an ancient Greek wonder.
Published by Alden Morris 70 months ago in Archaeology | +1 votes | 2 comments
The Mayas are among the greatest early civilization to have existed. There are hundreds of significant Maya sites, and thousands of smaller ones.
Published by Nobert Bermosa 73 months ago in Archaeology | +7 votes | 5 comments
Efforts of UNESCO to preserve the Bamiyan Valley archeological and cultural site after the destruction by the Taliban of the monumental Buddha statues of the 6th century.
Published by Judith Barton 80 months ago in Archaeology | +6 votes | 8 comments
The world oldest standing monument has 4000 years old. It was built around 2100 BC and it is older than the pyramid
Published by Wei Li Leow 80 months ago in Archaeology | +1 votes | 0 comments
The Moa was a giant flightless bird that was native to New Zealand. They all went extinct around 1400 CE, about 100 years after the first humans arrived in New Zealand.
Published by Travis Burdick 81 months ago in Archaeology | +2 votes | 1 comments
With the vast majority of public attention and cinematic romance focused around the three pyramids located at Giza (the Great Pyramid of Khufu, the Pyramid of Khafre and the Pyramid of Menkaure), it is often assumed that the great Egyptian civilization began and ended there. In actuality, the story of this once great empire began much further to the south in an area known as Nabta Playa.
Published by James R. Coffey 81 months ago in Archaeology | +10 votes | 10 comments
The Legend of the Incan City of Paititi is uncovered here. Here are some clues to its suspected whereabouts in the jungle.
Published by Aunty Ann 81 months ago in Archaeology | +34 votes | 19 comments
Diplodocus is a large sauropod that lived 154 to 150 million years ago. They lived exclusively in what is now western North America.
Published by Travis Burdick 81 months ago in Archaeology | +1 votes | 0 comments
Chan Chan is a labyrinth of adobe walls painted and carved intricately by a culture that predates the Inca Empire. The vast city of the Chimu Tribe flourished up until 1470 when it was conquered by the Inca.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 81 months ago in Archaeology | +8 votes | 5 comments
The Dilophosaurus is a carnivorous dinosaur that lived around 193 million years ago.
Published by Travis Burdick 81 months ago in Archaeology | +2 votes | 1 comments
The three-age system of Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age is a method of categorizing prehistoric periods according to tool technology.
Published by Terrie Schultz 82 months ago in Archaeology | +9 votes | 3 comments
Geopolymers are a type of concrete that was apparently used in the construction of the pyramids of Egypt that is denied by Zahu Hawass the Chief of Antiquities in Egypt.
Published by John Carter 82 months ago in Archaeology | +8 votes | 4 comments
The Deinonychus was the perfect predator who became prey to time and extinction.
Published by Travis Burdick 82 months ago in Archaeology | +4 votes | 3 comments
The Rosetta Stone triggered much of our understanding of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphics.
Published by Inforead 83 months ago in Archaeology | +1 votes | 0 comments
Ancient teeth uncovered in Israel may be from early man. The 400,000 year old teeth, dug up in a cave in central Israel, resemble those of other Homo sapiens remains found in Israel. But not eveyone agees they are from Homo sapiens.
Published by Joel Howald 83 months ago in Archaeology | +5 votes | 0 comments
While modern theorists have designed several engineering scenarios to explain how the Egyptians may have accomplished such incredible feats as the construction of the pyramids and the Great Sphinx, for example, other accomplishments remain within the realm of, “How could they possibly have conceived and accomplished that?” Case in point, the so-called “Schist Disk.”
Published by James R. Coffey 84 months ago in Archaeology | +11 votes | 25 comments
At an elevation of about 490 feet above sea level at the base, this unique pyramid is attributed to the funerary complex of Djedefre (2528–2520 BCE), the third ruler of ancient Egypt\\\\\\\'s 4th Dynasty, having been build not on flat terrain on the bank of the Nile River as with most pyramids, but atop an escarpment on the plateau of Gaa.
Published by James R. Coffey 84 months ago in Archaeology | +7 votes | 3 comments
This article deals primarily with giving the reader an introduction to biblical archeology and how it was instrumental to helping followers of the Bible to prove its historical background and thus strengthen its claims.
Published by Katherine Johnson 84 months ago in Archaeology | +7 votes | 3 comments
This article explains why dating techniques are important to the study of Archeology. It includes some of the different dating techniques used in archeology today.
Published by Katherine Johnson 84 months ago in Archaeology | +5 votes | 2 comments
Archeology is an important field that gives you a good idea about the past and the cultures that existed before this time, in order to accomplish this, they will use archeological excavation as a tool to find artifacts. This article teaches you about the different kinds of excavation processes.
Published by Katherine Johnson 84 months ago in Archaeology | +4 votes | 2 comments
Like the Canaanite Asherah of the Bronze Age, the Asherah of the Iron Age -the archeological period when Israel emerged- was connected with trees, snakes, fertility, and sexual rites. Israelites worshiped her, apparently alongside Yehova (Yahweh, Jehova). In this obscure biblical passage, there is a child being saved from a violent YHWH, an operation involving a penis, and wings, worn by a female rescuer.
Published by Dr. David Warmflash 84 months ago in Archaeology | +0 votes | 1 comments
A brief description on the discovery of the Antikythera Mechanism, the worlds first computer. Was it Archimedes, Hipparchos or some other genius of ancient times who created this work of ancient art?
Published by Jerrod Nazarian 84 months ago in Archaeology | +2 votes | 0 comments
Approaches to the scholarship of the text of the Tanach in relation to Judaism can range from the rabbinic approach, through somewhat of an apologist approach, to full-fledged biblical criticism. While there can be a certain amount of overlap between these three approaches as well as subcategories within each, if one wants to understand the environment no claims made by religious groups regarding the meaning of biblical passages should be taken at face value.
Published by Dr. David Warmflash 85 months ago in Archaeology | +2 votes | 2 comments
Albertosaurus was a carnivore that once graced the prehistoric world during the late Cretaceous period.
Published by Brenden Koo 85 months ago in Archaeology | +7 votes | 2 comments
Discussion of the sale of ancient coins on the black market.
Published by Auron Renius 85 months ago in Archaeology | +8 votes | 3 comments
The Mayas once inhabited the jungle-covered peninsula at the tip of the southern part of Mexico that curls like a tail. They were a cultured people, and as clever and industrious as the ancient Greeks and Romans. Their civilization lasted for centuries, and they built a number of magnificent cities. One of them, Chichen Itza, was founded about 400 A.D. and became the holy place for the Mayas.
Published by Yanto Yulianto 86 months ago in Archaeology | +4 votes | 1 comments
According to one of the earliest stories of the Bible, two cities, Sodom and Gomorrah and all their inhabitants were destroyed some 5,000 years ago for not living up to the ethical standards of God. But, did these ancient cities actually exist?
Published by James R. Coffey 87 months ago in Archaeology | +10 votes | 11 comments
The Titanoboa is an extinct snake. It is the largest snake to ever exist on this planet.
Published by Travis Burdick 88 months ago in Archaeology | +6 votes | 0 comments
Akrotiri lies on 49 acres on the Cycladic island of Thera. During the Bronze Age, Akrotiri was quite impressive with its elaborate construction. The town was occupied in the Late Neolithic period, but evolved into a major town in 2000BC. Like Pompeii, Akrotiri was the site of a volcanic disaster. The island, with its center hollowed out, left a crescent moon shape.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 88 months ago in Archaeology | +16 votes | 7 comments
Homo sapiens are the products of millions of years of evolution and our immediate circumstances. So how did bipedalism and big heads affect them?
Published by Lauren Axelrod 89 months ago in Archaeology | +21 votes | 7 comments
Pyramids were constructed by work gangs over a period of many years. The Pyramid Age spans over a thousand years, starting in the third dynasty and ending in the Second Intermediate Period.
Published by Akshay Giram 89 months ago in Archaeology | +5 votes | 2 comments
Hunter gathers arrived in Florida close to 12,000 years ago when the Florida land mass was much larger and drier. Mega fauna and mammoths were hunted in great herds and grains, nuts, and berries were gathered during seasonal roving. Spears were used to hunt and leather bags were used to cook what was captured, along with hot stones. You may know these early tribes as the Paleo-Indians.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 90 months ago in Archaeology | +21 votes | 9 comments
The Madara Rider sits 246 feet above ground, on a cliff face in the Madara Plateau of northeastern Bulgaria. The relief is inaccessible, adding to its mystery. How were they able to create it? With no ladders. No climbing apparatuses. Either way, the relief is extraordinary.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 90 months ago in Archaeology | +16 votes | 0 comments
This article discusses the evidence to the contrary of the Leakey's earth shaking discovery naming Homo habilis as the earliest tool users and by extension, the earliest specimen of the Genus Homo.
Published by Creighton Smith 90 months ago in Archaeology | +4 votes | 2 comments
This article describes varying interpretations of both skeletal remains and fossil footprints from Australopithicus afarensis in order to detrmine whether or not Lucy was an obligate biped.
Published by Creighton Smith 90 months ago in Archaeology | +2 votes | 3 comments
The Chateau Grimaldi, constructed during the 12th century, acted as a fortress and was raised on the foundations of what was once the Greek town of Antipolis. The Chateau Grimaldi later became the residence of the Bishops of Antibes and studio of Pablo Picasso.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 91 months ago in Archaeology | +13 votes | 4 comments
Kerameikos is an area of Athens, Greece, located to the northwest of Acropolis, which includes area both within and outside the city walls, on both sides of Dipylon Gate and the river banks of Eridanos River. It was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city.
Published by Ron Siojo 92 months ago in Archaeology | +15 votes | 9 comments
Slave labour, gigantic ramps, log rollers, kites and wind power, stones never quarried but actually cast in concrete, a vanished super civilization, alien race with superior technology – how was the Great Pyramid built?
Published by Rana Sinha 93 months ago in Archaeology | +28 votes | 13 comments
Ancient Egyptian jewelry is amongst some of the most rare and exquisite pieces of ancient history every found. Both men and women wore the Ancient Egyptian jewelry, and these personal adornments were not just limited to beaded necklaces and finger rings.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 93 months ago in Archaeology | +24 votes | 15 comments
“Where have we come from? Where are we going? What is the meaning of our lives? We cannot comprehend. So many pure souls under the blue circle of sky Burnt into ashes! But tell me, where is the smoke?”
Published by Colin Dovey 93 months ago in Archaeology | +12 votes | 11 comments
When we speak of pyramids the first place that comes to mind is “Egypt,” as great and well-known pyramids are found there. Another set of Pyramids are found in Mexico, but the one in China which is less popular has the same concept as the other known pyramids, but are greater in height and was by far the largest pyramid in the world.
Published by Alma Galvez 94 months ago in Archaeology | +32 votes | 21 comments
The Cro Magnon people left no written records about themselves, however they replaced the Neanderthals over 30,000 years ago.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 96 months ago in Archaeology | +17 votes | 3 comments
All it takes is a dated coin to date a whole archaeological site.
Published by Louie Jerome 102 months ago in Archaeology | +6 votes | 2 comments